What is Red Light Therapy?

Optimise your recovery by combining the synergistic effects of light, heat and skilful myofascial release. Our Red Light Therapy (a.k.a., low-level laser therapy) uses both wavelengths of natural red and near-infrared light (in the range of 660 nm and 850nm, respectively) to stimulate mitochondria in cells in adenosine triphosphate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) energy production. More ATP production translates to better physical performance, healing and recovery, improved energy and mood, and restful sleep.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, an equivalent concept of ATP is “Qi”. Qi has five functions: promoting, warming, defending, consolidating and governing, promoting metabolism and transformation. Qi deficiency can often result in muscular dysfunction, which can be typically treated with TCM-style Remedial Massage employed in this practice. Red Light Therapy layers additional dose of targeted treatment to replenish Qi, especially in areas that feels cold, damp, heavy and tired.

Red light therapy is a safe and easy way to add natural light and warmth to your life, especially for people with little outdoor exposure and during the winter season. Over here, you may combine Red Light Therapy with Remedial Massage Therapy to improve your overall physical and psychological wellbeing within the duration of one session.

Benefits of Red Light Therapy

Muscles

Red light therapy has been shown to improve muscle recovery by decreasing inflammation. One of the most scientifically reproducible effects of red light therapy is an overall reduction in inflammation, which is particularly important for disorders of the joints, muscles, traumatic injuries. Red and near-infrared light work through several evidence-based mechanisms in the body:

  • Reduce inflammation that will lead to cellular damage (and fatigue) in the muscle tissue as well.1
  • Enhance muscle growth, as well as increasing strength significantly.2
  • Promote the production of internal antioxidants by your cells, which prevents oxidative stress and damage to the muscle tissue.3
  • Increase the production of specific types of heat shock proteins that protect cells from oxidative damage, stress, and apoptosis (early cell death).4
Joints

Apart from reducing inflammation, red light therapy also increases collagen production. Collagen is one of the building blocks found in muscles and cartilage, healing damage to cartilage in inflamed joints.5

  • General Knee Pain. Red light therapy assists in restoring the joint structure and function. A systematic review published in the Australian Journal of Physiotherapy examined 11 clinical trials that demonstrated red light therapy reduces pain and improves health status in chronic joint disorders.6
  • Spine Pain. Recent studies suggest red light therapy is beneficial in the management of spinal conditions such as Ankylosing spondylitis. A 2016 study conducted on patients with ankylosing spondylitis indicated that the combination of red light therapy and stretching is more effective than stretching alone.7
Sleep quality

Sleep plays a critical role in the healing process. Natural red and near-infrared light increases melatonin in blood circulation. Compared to a control group, athletes who received red light therapy has improved sleep quality, melatonin levels, and endurance performance.8

Chronic pain

In addition to relieving acute pain, red light therapy could be an ongoing assistance to alleviate chronic pain. Here are several conditions where red light therapy has proven effective:

  • Chronic neck pain9
  • Knee pain10
  • Low back pain11
  • Chronic pain in the elbow, wrist and fingers12
  • Chronic joint disorders13
  • Sacroiliac joint pain14
  • Chronic tooth pain15
  • Osteoarthritic pain16

In a systematic review, researchers concluded that red light therapy has proven “beneficial for many individuals suffering from pain, regardless of the condition that is causing it.”17

Skin

Red light therapy is fast becoming recognized as a safe and welcome alternative to injections and surgeries for anti-aging and skin rejuvenation. Red light stimulates both collagen and elastin production, which reduce lines and wrinkles, appearance of scars, surface varicose veins, acne, and cellulite.

A wealth of human studies show that red and near-infrared light therapy can reverse the signs of aging, repair damage from UV rays, and reduce the appearance of lines, wrinkles, and even hard to remove scars:

  • Reduce the signs of aging.18
  • Reduce the signs of DNA damage19 and aging from UV rays20
  • Reduce wrinkles21
  • Reduce color patches, hyperpigmentation, and skin discoloration22
  • Enhance collagen synthesis and collagen density (research has shown it can enhance production of collagen by 31%)23,24
  • Accelerate repair in the epithelial layer of skin25
  • Combat other skin conditions like acne, keloids, vitiligo, burns, herpes virus sores, and psoriasis26
  • Speed wound healing by enhancing skin tissue repair and growth of skin cells27
Testosterone

Testosterone is produced mainly in the testicles (specifically in the Leydig cells) and the ovaries. Within these organs, cholesterol is converted to testosterone through a process called steroidogenesis. Recent research on mitochondrial function in Leydig cells demonstrates that “mitochondria must be energized, polarized, and actively respiring to support Leydig cell steroidogenesis”.28 As discussed above, red and near infrared light optimizes the use of oxygen within the mitochondria to synthesize energy in the form of ATP. Thus, red light therapy can help facilitate steroidogenesis and, ultimately, healthy testosterone production. 

Red light therapy can also help improve the quality of life of people with low testosterone by mitigating some of the symptoms. In fact, some of the many proven benefits of red light therapy include: 

  • Increased muscle mass and strength
  • Better athletic performance
  • Improved cognitive function
  • Improved mood
  • Better sleep
  • Skin and hair rejuvenation

Your Session Plan

Red Light Therapy (RLT) can be delivered as a full body or targeted treatment, alongside Remedial Massage Therapy (RMT):

  • Full body treatment will confer general benefits by activating the photoreceptors of the whole body. This will assist in improving overall energy, circulation, sleep and healing.
  • Targeted treatment will benefit individuals with specific pain areas, whereby the red light and heat can complement remedial massage techniques. In this way, immediate healing can be stimulated in the target area directly after the muscles have been released of trigger points and fascial adhesions.

Also, the inflamed regions will have more time-under-treatment, compared to a session without Red Light Therapy, translating to better treatment outcomes.

  • $0 add-on fee: 45mins RMT + 15mins RLT ($90, 60mins total treatment dose)

Each treatment done one at a time. One treatment area for RLT.

  • $15 add-on fee: 60mins RMT + 10mins RLT ($105, 70mins total treatment dose)

Both therapies done simultaneously in 60mins session. One treatment area for RLT.

  • $25 add-on fee: 60mins RMT + 20mins RLT ($115, 80mins total treatment dose)

Both therapies done simultaneously in 60mins session. Two treatment areas for RLT.

  • $65 add-on fee: 60mins RMT + 60mins RLT ($155, 120mins total treatment dose)

Both therapies done simultaneously in 60mins session. Complete full body RLT.

Device specifications

Our Red Light Therapy device uses medical grade technology to deliver 60,000 joules of energy every 10 mins. It features 210 medical grade LED’s that provide both red & near infrared wavelengths of light. A new dimming control feature is included to allow adjustment of LED’s power intensity for client’s comfort or treatment intensity requirement. 

It uses wavelengths of natural red (660 nm) and near-infrared light (850nm) simultaneously, within the most researched ranges of 630-680nm and 800-880nm. The irradiance value is >218mW/cm2, which maintains its therapeutic efficacy at 12 inch away from skin (when light placement is usually around 6 inch away).

Insert photos of treatment


FAQs

  • I am confused by all these different terms like photobiomodulation (PBM) and Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT). What are these and how do they differ from red/NIR light therapy?

    In short, these are all basically interchangeable terms. Historically speaking, it was thought that lasers (coherent light beams) had unique effects that were totally different from LEDs. Thus, the bulk of the research has been done with lasers and uses the term “low-level laser therapy” or LLLT for short. But now studies have shown that, in the realm of red light therapy, LEDs could reproduce similar effects to that of lasers.

  • What is the difference between red light and infrared light therapy?

    The difference between the two is that red light is clearly visible to the eye and at 660nm is absorbed externally by skin tissue, leading to increased collagen production and faster skin healing. Near infrared light is 850nm and is invisible to the human eye. It penetrates deeper into tissue, leading to increased muscle recovery, reduced joint pain and energy production.

  • Do red light devices emit UV light?

    No, they do not. UV light is another part of the light spectrum entirely separate from red and near-infrared.

  • Does red light therapy tan you or burn the skin?

    No. Tanning and sun burns come from UV rays. These devices do not emit UV light.

  • Can I get the benefits of red/NIR light therapy by standing in the sun?

    Yes and no.

    First, the truth is that if you were spending hours every day outdoors with the sun on your skin (like our ancestors did), then you probably don’t need a red/NIR light device.

    But since most of us do not spend hours a day with the sun on our body, we end up deficient in the nutrient of red/NIR light. So getting a red/NIR light treatment will be supplementary.

    Having said that, sun has benefits that red/NIR light does not have. The sun emits UV light, which we use for several purposes, like synthesizing vitamin D. It’s also going to be better for setting circadian rhythm in the morning.

    But red/NIR lights also have some advantages over the sun.

    One is convenience and access. Not everyone lives in a place that is sunny all year-round. And not everyone has the ability to get outdoors in the sun every day during the time of day where it’s warm and sunny.

    In addition, for very targeted treatments of specific issues, the sun is not going to give you the precision targeting of a light device that you can shine specifically on the thyroid gland or on a specific wound site with the precise light intensity and dose that will lead to the best effects.

    Also, the spectrum differs in important ways that affect some goals. In particular, for skin anti-aging (on the face for example), many people would want to avoid getting lots of UV on their face from the sun (which may accelerate skin damage and skin aging), but get the benefits of red/NIR. The sun doesn’t give you the ability to do this—with the sun, you get the whole spectrum of red, near-infrared, far-infrared, blue, and UV. But with a red/NIR light, you can get the therapeutic benefits on your skin while avoiding the potentially counterproductive wavelengths entirely.

    To be clear, red/NIR light devices are not a replacement for sunlight. We still need plenty of sun exposure to be healthy. But red/NIR light devices can make up for our lack of sun exposure and give us several targeted benefits in a way that we cannot get from the sun.

  • Does red/NIR light therapy work through clothes?

    The short answer is no. But if the clothing is very thin and light can penetrate it well, then maybe to some extent. How do you know if red light can penetrate it? Simply hold the fabric up next to the light while it’s on and see how much light gets through. You can literally observe it with your naked eye.

    Now, with most clothes, they will block at least 50% and more like 80%+ of the light, so if that is the case, just realize that it is massively lowering the dose of the light.

    For best results, do it on bare skin.

  • Do I have to wear eye protection?

    Eye protection is not necessary, goggles are provided just make the sessions comfortable for you. Red light has never been shown to be harmful to eyes.

  • 1 Bjordal, J. M., Lopes-Martins, R. A. B., & Iversen, V. V. (2006). A randomised, placebo controlled trial of low level laser therapy for activated Achilles tendinitis with microdialysis measurement of peritendinous prostaglandin E2 concentrations. British Journal of Sports Medicine40(1), 76-80.

    2 Halliwell, B., & Gutteridge, J. M. (2015). Free radicals in biology and medicine. Oxford University Press, USA.

    3 Avni, D., Levkovitz, S., Maltz, L., & Oron, U. (2005). Protection of skeletal muscles from ischemic injury: low-level laser therapy increases antioxidant activity. Photomedicine and Laser Therapy23(3), 273-277.

    4 de Almeida, P., et al. (2012). Red (660 nm) and infrared (830 nm) low-level laser therapy in skeletal muscle fatigue in humans: what is better?. Lasers in Medical Science27(2), 453-458.

    5 de Paula Gomes, C. A., et al. (2018). Incorporation of photobiomodulation therapy into a therapeutic exercise program for knee osteoarthritis: A placebo‐controlled, randomized, clinical trial. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine50(8), 819-828.

    6 Bjordal, J. M., Couppé, C., Chow, R. T., Tunér, J., & Ljunggren, E. A. (2003). A systematic review of low level laser therapy with location-specific doses for pain from chronic joint disorders. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy49(2), 107-116.

    7 Stasinopoulos, D., Papadopoulos, K., Lamnisos, D., & Stergioulas, A. (2016). LLLT for the management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Lasers in Medical Science31(3), 459-469.

    8 Zhao, J., Tian, Y., Nie, J., Xu, J., & Liu, D. (2012). Red light and the sleep quality and endurance performance of Chinese female basketball players. Journal of Athletic Training47(6), 673-678.

    9 Kingsley, J. D., Demchak, T., & Mathis, R. (2014). Low-level laser therapy as a treatment for chronic pain. Frontiers in Physiology5, 306.

    10 Kingsley, J. D., Demchak, T., & Mathis, R. (2014). Low-level laser therapy as a treatment for chronic pain. Frontiers in Physiology5, 306.

    11 Huang, Z., Ma, J., Chen, J., Shen, B., Pei, F., & Kraus, V. B. (2015). The effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for nonspecific chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Arthritis Research & Therapy17(1), 1-8.

    12 Okuni, I., Ushigome, N., Harada, T., Ohshiro, T., Musya, Y., & Sekiguchi, M. (2011). Low level laser therapy (lllt) for chronic joint pain of the elbow, wrist and fingers. Laser Therapy, 1112300019-1112300019.

    13 Bjordal, J. M., Couppé, C., Chow, R. T., Tunér, J., & Ljunggren, E. A. (2003). A systematic review of low level laser therapy with location-specific doses for pain from chronic joint disorders. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy49(2), 107-116.

    14 Ohkuni, I., et al. (2011). Low level laser therapy (LLLT) for patients with sacroiliac joint pain. Laser Therapy20(2), 117-121.

    15 Arslan, H., Doğanay, E., Karataş, E., Ünlü, M. A., & Ahmed, H. M. A. (2017). Effect of low-level laser therapy on postoperative pain after root canal retreatment: A preliminary placebo-controlled, triple-blind, randomized clinical trial. Journal of Endodontics43(11), 1765-1769.

    16 Dima, R., Francio, V. T., Towery, C., & Davani, S. (2017). Review of literature on low-level laser therapy benefits for nonpharmacological pain control in chronic pain and osteoarthritis. Trials5, 6.

    17 Kingsley, J. D., Demchak, T., & Mathis, R. (2014). Low-level laser therapy as a treatment for chronic pain. Frontiers in Physiology5, 306.

    18 Avci, P., Gupta, A., Sadasivam, M., Vecchio, D., Pam, Z., Pam, N., & Hamblin, M. R. (2013, March). Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring. In Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery (Vol. 32, No. 1, p. 41). NIH Public Access.

    19 Pinheiro, A. L. B., Nascimento, S. C., de Barros Vieira, A. L., Brugnera Jr, A., Zanin, F. A., Rolim, A. B., & Soriano da Silva, P. (2002). Effects of low-level laser therapy on malignant cells: in vitro study. Journal of Clinical Laser Medicine & Surgery20(1), 23-26.

    20 Jiang, M., Yan, F., Avram, M., & Lu, Z. (2017). A prospective study of the safety and efficacy of a combined bipolar radiofrequency, intense pulsed light, and infrared diode laser treatment for global facial photoaging. Lasers in Medical Science32(5), 1051-1061.

    21 Kim, H. K., & Choi, J. H. (2017). Effects of radiofrequency, electroacupuncture, and low-level laser therapy on the wrinkles and moisture content of the forehead, eyes, and cheek. Journal of Physical Therapy Science29(2), 290-294.

    22 Avci, P., Gupta, A., Sadasivam, M., Vecchio, D., Pam, Z., Pam, N., & Hamblin, M. R. (2013, March). Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) in skin: stimulating, healing, restoring. In Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery (Vol. 32, No. 1, p. 41). NIH Public Access.

    23 Barolet, D., Roberge, C. J., Auger, F. A., Boucher, A., & Germain, L. (2009). Regulation of skin collagen metabolism in vitro using a pulsed 660 nm LED light source: Clinical correlation with a single-blinded study. Journal of Investigative Dermatology129(12), 2751-2759.

    24 Wunsch, A., & Matuschka, K. (2014). A controlled trial to determine the efficacy of red and near-infrared light treatment in patient satisfaction, reduction of fine lines, wrinkles, skin roughness, and intradermal collagen density increase. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery32(2), 93-100.

    25 Wunsch, A., & Matuschka, K. (2014). A controlled trial to determine the efficacy of red and near-infrared light treatment in patient satisfaction, reduction of fine lines, wrinkles, skin roughness, and intradermal collagen density increase. Photomedicine and Laser Surgery32(2), 93-100.

    26 Jiang, M., Yan, F., Avram, M., & Lu, Z. (2017). A prospective study of the safety and efficacy of a combined bipolar radiofrequency, intense pulsed light, and infrared diode laser treatment for global facial photoaging. Lasers in Medical Science32(5), 1051-1061.

    27 Barolet, D. (2016). Accelerating ablative fractional resurfacing wound healing recovery by photobiomodulation. Current Dermatology Reports5(3), 232-238.

    28 Hales, D. B., Allen, J. A., Shankara, T., Janus, P., Buck, S., Diemer, T., & Hales, K. H. (2005). Mitochondrial function in Leydig cell steroidogenesis. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences1061(1), 120-134.